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Food vs. Fuel: the debate is over

GUELPH, ON (April 26, 2011) – A new study released by the Grain Farmers of Ontario should put an end to the ongoing debate of whether the grain we grow should be used for food or fuel.  We can and should do both.

The abundance of grain grown by farmers around the world and here in Ontario can both protect the environment and feed the world.  As farm yields climb and investments are made in farm production in the developing world, feeding and fueling the world can even be done cost effectively.

“My corn yields have increased by 35 percent since I started farming in 1975,” says Don Kenny who farms just outside of Ottawa and is the chair of Grain Farmers of Ontario.  “I am confident that my land will continue to be productive and that new products and technologies will ensure my family supplies our local livestock market and the ethanol plant down the road for many years to come.”

According to the study by Dr. Terry Daynard and KD Communications, by including an average of just 5% ethanol in regular gasoline, Canadians are reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 2.3 million tonnes annually while saving money.  Five percent ethanol blending has reduced annual family gasoline expenditures by more than $100 per year.  Ethanol is also credited with replacing hazardous compounds in gasoline used for octane enhancement and increasing engine efficiency. 

There is also good news for the world’s food supply. Food demands around the world are growing by 1.1% per year according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Fortunately, the Grain Farmers of Ontario study reveals that global grain production has increased by 1.5% per year over the past 20 years. With increasing resources now being directed to agricultural development in some of the world’s hungriest countries, especially in Africa, there is optimism that we will continue to grow the crops and increase production where the need is greatest.

“Quite frankly, it is a relief for us to learn that production of biofuels, like ethanol, here in Ontario makes such a positive contribution to our environment without any notable impact on overall food prices and the world’s ability to supply food,” says Barry Senft, CEO for Grain Farmers of Ontario.  “Regardless of this discussion, our farmers are dedicated to growing a sufficient supply of food for Canadian families”.

Grain Farmers of Ontario

Grain Farmers of Ontario is the province’s largest commodity organization, representing Ontario’s 28,000 corn, soybean and wheat farmers. The crops they grow cover 6 million acres of farm land across the province, generate over $2.5 billion in farm gate receipts, result in over $9 billion in economic output and are responsible for over 40,000 jobs in the province.

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Grain Market Commentary for October 18, 2017

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Commodity Period Price Weekly Movement
Corn CBOT December 3.48  01 cents
Soybeans CBOT November 9.84  08 cents
Wheat CBOT December 4.30  01 cents
Wheat Minn. December 6.10  02 cents
Wheat Kansas December 4.28  02 cents
Chicago Oats December 2.68  06 cents
Canadian $ December 0.8025  0.10 points

Harvest 2017 prices as of the close, October 18 are as follows: SWW @ $183.15/MT ($4.98/bu), HRW @ $192.30/MT ($5.23/bu), HRS @ $238.09/MT ($6.48/bu), SRW @ $187.72/MT ($5.11/bu).

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Market Trends Report for October-November 2017

Monday, October 16, 2017

It is that time of year again when combines are rolling. However, uneven weather in parts of the American corn belt and Ontario has delayed harvest. There is nothing particularly unusual about this as we have it every year. US crops are huge coming off the fields and the market will certainly be making further adjustments. The final determinant on yield will come in the January USDA report. However, the October USDA report released October 12th helped to re-focus the trajectory of grain prices as we head into the end of the 2017.

In the October 12th report USDA increased US national corn yield to 171.8 bushels per acre, an increase of 1.9 bushels per acre over their September estimate. This put 2017/2018-corn production at 14.28 billion bushels on the high-end of pre-report estimates. The USDA also pegged corn-ending stocks at 2.34 billion bushels, which was up 5 million bushels from their September estimate. This number was a bit of a surprise especially with which dry weather throughout the American Midwest the summer.

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USDA estimated soybean production to be at 4.431 billion bushels, which was a decrease from their September estimate. This was based on a .4 bushel/acre cut in US national yield down to 49.5 bushels per acre. However, the US soybean harvested acreage is at a record high of 89.5 million acres, which was up 1% from the USDA September estimate. The US domestic soybean ending stocks were also pegged at 430 million bushels, which was down 45 million bushels from their September estimate. This was generally looked at as bullish on report day and soybeans responded by going up $.26 a bushel. US domestic wheat stocks were set at 960 million bushels, which was 27 million bushels higher than their September estimate.

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