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Grain Farmers of Ontario extremely disappointed with pesticide restriction announcement

GUELPH, ON (July 7, 2014) – Grain Farmers of Ontario is extremely disappointed to have read yesterday’s media statement that Ontario’s newly appointed Minister of Agriculture intends to make this province the first in Canada to restrict the use of neonicotinoid pesticides.

The Ontario grain industry has committed extensive resources over the past two years to mitigate the risk to bees. Many of these initiatives have been launched and put into practice this growing season and the results of ongoing research projects and in-field practices will be paramount in determining any future regulatory decisions. It is counterintuitive to implement a regulatory change without the completion of this research and trials.

“The effort and leadership grain farmers have demonstrated on this issue has been second to none, and to have this discounted with such a rash move and announcement through media, is frankly insulting,” says Henry Van Ankum, Chair of Grain Farmers of Ontario. “Farmers across the countryside have modified their equipment, are participating in field trials, are using the new mandatory fluency agent which has proven successful, and have forged good, open communications with many beekeepers — we have a lot to share with Minister Leal and have not yet had the opportunity.”

The move Minister Leal is proposing is a move against Canada’s science based regulatory system. Ironically, on July 3rd, Minister Leal sent a letter to Grain Farmers of Ontario for publication in the Ontario Grain Farmer magazine stating “we must continue to ensure decisions are balanced and based in science”. Naturally, the organization is confused by these contradictory messages, only days apart.

Further, farmers across the province are shocked by the manner this announcement was made. Grain farmers have demonstrated their cooperation with government on this issue since 2012 and have had a positive working relationship with those involved in the bee health file. Grain Farmers of Ontario is extremely disappointed that Minister Leal did not take the time to consult the organization as there will be negative financial impact to Ontario’s corn and soybean farmers and the grain industry as a whole.

Grain Farmers of Ontario has always had a good working relationship with the Minister of Agriculture and we hope that this continues in the future. This is not a good start — our organization believes in an open and collaborative approach and we encourage this government to work cooperatively with us as we move forward. 

Grain Farmers of Ontario

Grain Farmers of Ontario is the province’s largest commodity organization, representing Ontario’s 28,000 corn, soybean and wheat farmers. The crops they grow cover 6 million acres of farm land across the province, generate over $2.5 billion in farm gate receipts, result in over $9 billion in economic output and are responsible for over 40,000 jobs in the province.

Contact:

Barry Senft, CEO - 1-800-265-0550; bsenft@gfo.ca

Henry Van Ankum, Chair - 519-835-4200; henryvanankum@sympatico.ca

Meghan Burke, Communications – 519 767-2773; mburke@gfo.ca

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Grain Market Commentary for October 18, 2017

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Commodity Period Price Weekly Movement
Corn CBOT December 3.48  01 cents
Soybeans CBOT November 9.84  08 cents
Wheat CBOT December 4.30  01 cents
Wheat Minn. December 6.10  02 cents
Wheat Kansas December 4.28  02 cents
Chicago Oats December 2.68  06 cents
Canadian $ December 0.8025  0.10 points

Harvest 2017 prices as of the close, October 18 are as follows: SWW @ $183.15/MT ($4.98/bu), HRW @ $192.30/MT ($5.23/bu), HRS @ $238.09/MT ($6.48/bu), SRW @ $187.72/MT ($5.11/bu).

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Market Trends Report for October-November 2017

Monday, October 16, 2017

It is that time of year again when combines are rolling. However, uneven weather in parts of the American corn belt and Ontario has delayed harvest. There is nothing particularly unusual about this as we have it every year. US crops are huge coming off the fields and the market will certainly be making further adjustments. The final determinant on yield will come in the January USDA report. However, the October USDA report released October 12th helped to re-focus the trajectory of grain prices as we head into the end of the 2017.

In the October 12th report USDA increased US national corn yield to 171.8 bushels per acre, an increase of 1.9 bushels per acre over their September estimate. This put 2017/2018-corn production at 14.28 billion bushels on the high-end of pre-report estimates. The USDA also pegged corn-ending stocks at 2.34 billion bushels, which was up 5 million bushels from their September estimate. This number was a bit of a surprise especially with which dry weather throughout the American Midwest the summer.

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USDA estimated soybean production to be at 4.431 billion bushels, which was a decrease from their September estimate. This was based on a .4 bushel/acre cut in US national yield down to 49.5 bushels per acre. However, the US soybean harvested acreage is at a record high of 89.5 million acres, which was up 1% from the USDA September estimate. The US domestic soybean ending stocks were also pegged at 430 million bushels, which was down 45 million bushels from their September estimate. This was generally looked at as bullish on report day and soybeans responded by going up $.26 a bushel. US domestic wheat stocks were set at 960 million bushels, which was 27 million bushels higher than their September estimate.

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