Grain Farmers of Ontario firmly opposes draft seed treatment regulations

GUELPH, ON (April 9, 2015) – Following a technical briefing from the Ontario Ministry of Environment and Climate Change and the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, as well as a thorough review of the draft seed treatment regulations, Grain Farmers of Ontario has determined the regulations to be unworkable and the organization strongly opposes any action to move them forward.

“Our organization has spent a significant amount of time reviewing and evaluating the draft regulations and brought forward numerous questions to the Ontario government regarding various aspects of the plan,” says Mark Brock, Chair of Grain Farmers of Ontario. “The lack of clarity, inability to address very real on-farm challenges with respect to implementation of the regulations, and the timelines imposed on the industry as a whole create an unmanageable, widespread burden to agriculture.”

The regulations present countless areas of concern including, but not limited to, pest assessment methods, selection of pests identified as valid, industry capacity to manage requirements, and liability and insurance implications.

“The regulations, as drafted, create insurmountable barriers to access neonicotinoid seed treatment – essentially, the government has developed a ban on the product,” says Brock. “The primary concern for our organization is the livelihood of Ontario’s grain farmers, and these regulations will be highly detrimental to the sustainability of these farmers, with many members wondering if there is a future for the next generation of family farmers in this province.”

The implications beyond the farm level are extensive as well, with agricultural science and technology companies moving investments out of Ontario. As a regulation made outside of scientific evidence and based in the precautionary principle, it signals that Ontario operates unique to the rest of North America and is a high risk market with an unpredictable regulatory system.

“Grain Farmers of Ontario sees no opportunity to collaborate on these regulations because the number of fundamental, unworkable areas is far too extensive,” says Brock. “We care very much about the health of pollinators and have worked with stakeholders, including beekeepers, to find a collaborative and sustainable approach forward for agriculture and bees, which was the Ontario Pollinator Health Blueprint and which the government dismissed entirely. Remaining focussed on a positive future for agriculture in this province, Grain Farmers of Ontario firmly opposes the draft seed treatment regulations.” 

Grain Farmers of Ontario

Grain Farmers of Ontario is the province’s largest commodity organization, representing Ontario’s 28,000 corn, soybean and wheat farmers. The crops they grow cover 6 million acres of farm land across the province, generate over $2.5 billion in farm gate receipts, result in over $9 billion in economic output and are responsible for over 40,000 jobs in the province.


Mark Brock, Chair - 519-274-3297;

Meghan Burke, Communications – 519 767-2773;

Stay in touch

Attend the March Classic

March Classic logo

Leadership for Tomorrow: March 20, 2018, at the London Convention Centre.

#GrainTalk: Targeting Pest Management

On April 4, from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m, join our free #GrainTalk webinar to hear industry experts discuss early season field topics.

Register here

Subscribe to the Bottom Line

Subscribe to The Bottom Line, the weekly newsletter that helps our members stay on top of all the news that affects their bottom line.


Inside Grain Farmers of Ontario

New episodes every week.

Episode 74: Ottawa Valley Farm Show

Weekly Commentary

Get Aggregated RSS

Grain Market Commentary for March 7, 2018

Wednesday, March 07, 2018

Commodity Period Price Weekly Movement
Corn CBOT May 3.87 ↑ 13 cents
Soybeans CBOT May 10.65 ↑ 10 cents
Wheat CBOT May 4.97  02 cents
Wheat Minn. May 6.20 02 cents
Wheat Kansas May 5.34  12 cents
Chicago Oats May 2.64  06 cents
Canadian $ March 0.7731 ↓ 0.65 points

Cash Grain prices as of the close, March 7, are as follows: SWW @ $238.66 ($6.50/bu), HRW @ $233.91/MT ($6.37/bu), HRS @ $248.62/MT ($6.77/bu), SRW @ $231.54/MT ($6.30/bu).

Read more

Market Trends

Get Aggregated RSS

Market Trends Report for March-April 2018

Monday, March 12, 2018

March is often a time in the grain markets where we can see movement in the production area of South America, which can be impacted by weather events. The big US crop has long been put away and is slowly moving out to end-users across the greater hinterland. Problems in Argentina with severe drought conditions have dominated the landscape over the last 30 days as prices have gone up to become much more volatile based on this weather market. Increasingly so, farmers need to watch the weather maps of South America to get clues of production conditions in the southern hemisphere.

Listen to the podcast

The USDA is starting in on their projection season. On February 22nd during their Outlook forum predictions for 2018 corn and soybean acres came in equally at 90 million acres. So let the games begin. An even bigger USDA report will come March 29th when the USDA releases its prospective plantings report. Markets will be focused on that day to see if there are any surprises.

Read more

mobile apps