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Grain Farmers of Ontario responds to government's rejection of neonics ban extension

GUELPH, ON (May 4, 2015) – The Government of Ontario has refused to extend the public comment period on the proposed seed treatment regulations aimed at banning neonicotinoids.

The public comment period closes on May 7, 2015, which is the most important day for corn planting in Ontario, as stated on the Ministry of Agriculture's website, as well as key planting time for soybeans. 

"The decision to not grant an extension makes it very clear that farmers in Ontario are not being considered," says Barry Senft, CEO of Grain Farmers of Ontario. "The government appears happy to shut out rural voices and only listen to the urban voters who elected them, when making policy decisions for rural Ontario."

Minister Glen Murray is allowing special interest groups to determine the fate and livelihood of Ontario's $9 billion grain industry, while farmers are working hard to ensure crops are planted at the right time to feed and fuel Ontario.

The Ministry of Environment and Climate Change provided 60 days in December 2014 for a consultation period relating to the proposed neonicotinoid ban, and despite 'record breaking' interest in the topic, has cut the consultation time frame down 25% and scheduled consultations for exactly the wrong time of the year for the key stakeholders – farmers.

"The rush to implement these dubious regulations is completely driven by wedge-politics and cannot be seriously expected to protect pollinators to the extent the government is claiming,” says Mark Brock, Chair of Grain Farmers of Ontario. “We are frustrated because we want to work with them on solving the challenges facing pollinators, but instead they seem totally focused on attacking our industry on behalf of agenda-driven anti-agriculture groups.” 

Grain Farmers of Ontario

Grain Farmers of Ontario is the province’s largest commodity organization, representing Ontario’s 28,000 corn, soybean and wheat farmers. The crops they grow cover 6 million acres of farm land across the province, generate over $2.5 billion in farm gate receipts, result in over $9 billion in economic output and are responsible for over 40,000 jobs in the province.

Contact:

Barry Senft, CEO - 1-800-265-0550; bsenft@gfo.ca

Mark Brock, Chair - 519-274-3297; cropper01@hotmail.com

Meghan Burke, Communications – 519 767-2773; mburke@gfo.ca

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Weekly Commentary

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Grain Market Commentary for September 13, 2017

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Commodity Period Price Weekly Movement
Corn CBOT December 3.51  10 cents
Soybeans CBOT November 9.60  11 cents
Wheat CBOT December 4.43  03 cents
Wheat Minn. December 6.43  01 cents
Wheat Kansas December 4.44  05 cents
Chicago Oats December 2.38  05 cents
Canadian $ December 0.8196  0.15 points

Harvest 2017 prices as of the close, September 13 are as follows:
SWW @ $182.92/MT ($4.98/bu), HRW @ $185.15/MT ($5.04/bu),
HRS @ $238.95/MT ($6.50/bu), SRW @ $182.91/MT ($4.98/bu).

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Market Trends Report for September-October 2017

Monday, September 18, 2017

US and World

Across the US corn belt American farmers are starting to harvest another huge crop. The growing season was uneven with widespread drought in the Northwest plains and quite a wet start in the Eastern corn belt. This was accentuated by somewhat dry conditions in mid-summer, but it looks like good genetics and modern farming methods have won out. As we careen into October, US farmers are set to harvest their third-largest corn crop and the largest soybean crop ever.

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On September 12th the USDA released their latest estimates of US crops. USDA estimated US corn production would come in at 14.184 billion bushels, with an average yield of 169.9 bushels per acre. This was seen as a bit of a shock to the market as traders were expecting lower yield estimates. The USDA also increased 2017/18 ending stocks to 2.335 billion bushels, up 62 million from their August report. This US crop is approximately 6% less than last year with the yield 4.7 bushels per acre lower.

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