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Seed treatment regulations part of a thinly veiled attack on agriculture

Ministry of Environment and Climate Change pushing larger agenda

GUELPH, ON (May 6, 2015) – Based on a number of comments made by the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, it is evident that the rush to impose a near-ban on neonicotinoid treated seed is part of a broader strategy to restrict modern farming practices in Ontario.

As part of the proposed regulation, treated seed will be defined as a new class of pesticide, Class 12. In an interview with the Ontario Beekeepers Association, Minister Glen Murray was quoted as saying “this new Class 12 category is intended to deal with the family of neonicotinoids, and as it grows we can actually quickly move others in there”. At a recent Organic Council of Ontario meeting, he made comments that suggest he intends to go after other pesticide use and promoted organic farming as one way to reduce climate change.

Murray is using the veil of bee health to push his agenda. The 2014 Annual Report from the Province’s Apiarist notes that, following the action taken by the federal government through the Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA), Ontario’s grain farmers were able to contribute to a 70% decrease in in-season bee mortality incidents during the planting season in May 2014. The same study lists nine factors involved in bee health issues across the province, with weather and starvation named the top two. Ontario’s Apiarist is calling for extensive research in Ontario to better understand what is happening to honey bees in the province, advice Murray seems to reject. 

"It is stunning that the government has provincial, evidence-based information readily available to them that demonstrates that the proposed neonicotinoid ban will do little to help pollinators, yet Glen Murray continues to push these regulations as a solution to bee health," says Barry Senft, CEO of Grain Farmers of Ontario. “There’s no reason to believe the Minister can be this misinformed by accident – he isn’t interested in the reality and impacts of these regulations, but rather a broader agenda on modern agriculture.”

Grain Farmers of Ontario is looking to Premier Kathleen Wynne to rein-in the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, recognizing the pace and force with which these regulations are being imposed is irresponsible and the Minister has openly expressed that he has another agenda at play. 

Grain Farmers of Ontario

Grain Farmers of Ontario is the province’s largest commodity organization, representing Ontario’s 28,000 corn, soybean and wheat farmers. The crops they grow cover 6 million acres of farm land across the province, generate over $2.5 billion in farm gate receipts, result in over $9 billion in economic output and are responsible for over 40,000 jobs in the province.

Contact:

Barry Senft, CEO - 1-800-265-0550; bsenft@gfo.ca

Meghan Burke, Communications – 519 767-2773; mburke@gfo.ca

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Grain Market Commentary for July 19, 2017

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Commodity Period Price Weekly Movement
Corn CBOT September 3.82  03 cents
Soybeans CBOT November 10.12  25 cents
Wheat CBOT September 5.03  32 cents
Wheat Minn. September 7.75  06 cents
Wheat Kansas September 5.00  44 cents
Chicago Oats September 2.93  11 cents
Canadian $ September 0.7950  1.00 points

Harvest 2017 prices as of the close, July 19 are as follows:
SWW @ $218.72/MT ($5.95/bu), HRW @ $218.72/MT ($5.95/bu),
HRS @ $289.01/MT ($7.87/bu), SRW @ $217.90/MT ($5.93/bu).

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Special Post June 30 USDA Market Trends Report

Tuesday, July 04, 2017

US and the World

It can be an explosive time in the grain markets. Across the greater US corn belt corn, soybeans and wheat are showing great variability as we head into July. Historically, the July 4th weekend has always served as a market flashpoint as crops start to develop quickly and summer weather makes its impact. The June 30th USDA planted acreage estimates and quarterly stocks report also impact the market at this critical time. In 2017, we are here again and once again the USDA did provide some surprises for market action.

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In their June 30th USDA report many market observers were musing that US soybean acres may overtake US corn acres planted. However, that was not the case as USDA predicted US corn planting at 90.89 million acres and US soybean planting coming in at 89.51 million acres. US corn acreage is down 3.11 million acres from last year. The US soybean acreage was approximately 440,000 acres below pre report estimates, but still 7% higher than last year. All wheat acreage came in at approximately 45.66 million acres, which was the lowest since the USDA began keeping records in 1919.

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