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Use of Manipulator on the 2016 Ontario Wheat Crop

Joint statement from Grain Farmers of Ontario and the Ontario Agri Business Association

GUELPH, ON (February 19, 2016) - Over the past several weeks, Grain Farmers of Ontario and the Ontario Agri Business Association (OABA) have been involved in a broad industry discussion regarding the serious implications of using Manipulator™ (chlormequat chloride) as a growth regulator on the 2016 Ontario wheat crop. With particular emphasis on the fact that Manipulator™ has not yet received approval for use in the United States, OABA and Grain Farmers of Ontario have liaised with Ontario flour millers, wheat exporters, and Engage Agro (the Canadian distributor for Manipulator™) to discuss the implications of using this product on the 2016 Ontario wheat crop.

joint statement from GFO and OABA

It is essential that all industry supply chain participants (including growers, ag-retailers, country grain elevators, terminal grain elevators, feed mills, flour mills, etc.) are fully aware of the following facts.

  • Manipulator™ is a plant growth regulator for use in wheat.
  • Manipulator™ is approved for use in Canada and the European Union on cereals, but approval has NOT yet been obtained for use of the product in the United States.
  • Without product approval, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency currently has a zero tolerance for any residues of the product (active ingredient).
  • Many Ontario country and terminal grain elevators have already established policies confirming that they will not be accepting wheat that has been treated with Manipulator™. OABA encourages all OABA ag-retail, grain elevator, and feed manufacturing members to communicate the seriousness of this situation with wheat growing customers.
  • Ontario flour millers (P&H Milling Group, ADM Milling, and Ardent Mills) have formally issued letters to suppliers that they will not accept wheat that has been treated with Manipulator™ (chlormequat chloride).
  • Grain Farmers of Ontario encourages Ontario farmers NOT to use Manipulator™ on the 2016 Ontario wheat crop due to the inherent market risk. 

OABA and Grain Farmers of Ontario recommend that ag-retailers and grain elevators communicate with wheat growers the serious consequences associated with the application of Manipulator™ on the 2016 wheat crop, and that all members of the wheat supply chain ensure that Manipulator™ is NOT used on the 2016 Ontario wheat crop.

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Grain Market Commentary for August 16, 2017

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Commodity Period Price Weekly Movement
Corn CBOT September 3.52  20 cents
Soybeans CBOT November 9.25  53 cents
Wheat CBOT September 4.20  44 cents
Wheat Minn. September 6.73  60 cents
Wheat Kansas September 4.20  24 cents
Chicago Oats September 2.60  10 cents
Canadian $ September 0.7898  0.15 points

Harvest 2017 prices as of the close, August 16 are as follows:
SWW @ $182.43/MT ($4.96/bu), HRW @ $189.46/MT ($5.16/bu),
HRS @ $254.49/MT ($6.93/bu), SRW @ $187.11/MT ($5.09/bu).

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Market Trends Report for August-September 2017

Monday, August 14, 2017

US and World

It has been an uneven growing season in much of the American corn belt. The Western corn belt has been dry especially in the Dakotas, while the mid south and Eastern corn belt were inundated with heavy rains earlier in the spring. The forecast in late July turned cooler and wetter for all of the American corn belt. This new forecast essentially changed much of the outlook for the American crop, but still many analysts were expecting lower August USDA numbers reflecting some of the earlier tough conditions for US corn and soybeans. Anticipation of the August 10th USDA report was filled with expectations of lower yield projections.

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On August 10th, the USDA lowered their projected corn yield estimate to 169.5 bushels per acre down from their earlier projection of 170.7 bushels per acre and less than last year's 174.6 bushels per acre. At the same time the USDA raised soybean yield expectations to 49.4 bushels per acre up from their 48 bushels per acre earlier estimate. This pegged 2017/18-soybean production at 4.4 billion bushels. Both of these USDA estimates rocked the grain market August 10th, as it was a big surprise. With so much uneven weather affecting this crop in the field a US corn yield of 165-166 bushels per acre was a general trade estimate. Futures prices plummeted on this very bearish report.

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