News

Strong Overwintering Numbers Reported for Ontario Bees

GUELPH, ON (July 20, 2016) – Ontario’s bees overwintered well this past year, as losses of only 18% were reported by the Canadian Association of Professional Apiculturists yesterday.

Nationally, average overwintering losses were 17%, putting Ontario on-par with the rest of the country and several provinces reporting significantly higher losses than this province. The top two reasons for bee losses noted by Ontario beekeepers were poor queens and starvation.

"We are pleased to see these promising numbers for bees in our province,” says Mark Brock, Chair of Grain Farmers of Ontario. “This year’s losses are less than half of what was experienced the previous year."

When considering the impact of weather, Ontario’s overwintering losses appear higher following severe winters and lower following mild winters. For instance, low losses (only 12%) were reported during the mild 2011/12 winter, while higher losses (over 30%) were reported during the following two long, harsh winters. This past winter brought moderate weather, and continuing this trend, brought lower bee losses.

"It is worth noting that the most recent overwintering numbers are prior to Ontario’s seed treatment regulations being in place," says Brock. "As we continue to see data that indicates strong bee populations and numerous bee health factors, it reinforces that Ontario’s rush to restrict neonicotinoids was unnecessary."

Grain Farmers of Ontario

Grain Farmers of Ontario is the province’s largest commodity organization, representing Ontario’s 28,000 barley, corn, oat, soybean and wheat farmers. The crops they grow cover 6 million acres of farm land across the province, generate over $2.5 billion in farm gate receipts, result in over $9 billion in economic output and are responsible for over 40,000 jobs in the province.

Contact:

Mark Brock, Chair - 519-274-3297; cropper01@hotmail.com

Meghan Burke, Communications – 519 767-2773; mburke@gfo.ca

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Episode 70: Member Relations

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Grain Market Commentary for February 7, 2018

Thursday, February 08, 2018

Grain Farmers of Ontario farmer-members are invited to attend two full-day marketing seminars on grain marketing: Intro to Futures & Options, as well as the more advanced Options & Technical Analysis.

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Commodity Period Price Weekly Movement
Corn CBOT March 3.61 ↑ 05 cents
Soybeans CBOT March 9.96 ↑ 04 cents
Wheat CBOT March 4.51 ↑ 18 cents
Wheat Minn. March 6.07 ↑ 01 cents
Wheat Kansas March 4.67 ↑ 35 cents
Chicago Oats March 2.65 ↓ 10 cents
Canadian $ March 0.8130 ↑ 0.23 points

Notice: The commentary for all commodities was written at 10 a.m. on February 8 before the release of the February United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) report.

Cash Grain prices as of the close, February 7, are as follows: SWW @ $210.13 ($5.72/bu), HRW @ $207.82/MT ($5.66/bu), HRS @ $233.89/MT ($6.37/bu), SRW @ $205.52/MT ($5.59/bu).

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Market Trends Report for February-March 2018

Monday, February 12, 2018

The winter season in North America is often one of hopes and dreams. With the January 2018 USDA report a month old the scope of the 2017 crop is now becoming a memory. Farmers have turned the page and will soon be planting corn in places like Texas. However, in the southern hemisphere corn and soybean crops are growing in the field and affecting prices every day. While the northern hemisphere freezes under the snow, weather in Argentina and Brazil has been defining the initial grain fundamentals for 2018.

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On February 8th, the USDA released its latest World Supply and Demand Estimates. (WASDE) The USDA lowered US corn ending stocks to 2.352 billion bushels down 125 million bushels from last month. This was totally related to an increase in US corn exports by the same amount. This was attributed to a weakened US dollar and reduction in both Argentinian and Ukrainian corn exports. Hot weather in Argentina had USDA lowering their corn production 2.8 MMT to 39 MMT. USDA maintained Brazil corn production of 95 MMT.

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